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Bolton questions how much time Trump spends watching TV versus listening to advisers

Eric Shawn: John Bolton on the Russian bounties report

The former national security advisor on his claims….and critics.

John Bolton on Sunday continued to deride President Trump amid their ongoing feud – this time by suggesting that Trump spends more time watching television than he does listening to his advisers.

“I think that if you could clock the amount of time he spends actually in the Oval Office versus the amount of time he spends in the little dining room off the Oval Office with the cable news networks in one form or another on, it would be a very interesting statistic,” Bolton said on CBS’s “Face The Nation.”

BOLTON THOUGHT TRUMP-ZELENSKY CALL WOULD BE A 'DISASTER'

Bolton, who previously served as Trump’s national security adviser, has been on a very public campaign recently criticizing the president following the publication of his tell-all memoir “The Room Where It Happened.”

The Trump administration tried to block the release of the book because of concerns that classified information could be exposed, but a federal judge last month ruled the publishing could move forward.

Bolton has defended his decision to write a tell-all about his time in the Trump administration and denied violating record-keeping laws by destroying his notes while in the White House.

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Bolton's book depicts a president whose foreign policy objectives were inexorably linked to his own political gain.

Bolton says Trump “pleaded” with China’s Xi Jinping during a 2019 summit to help Trump's reelection prospects. Bolton also writes that Trump linked the supply of military assistance to Ukraine to that country’s willingness to conduct investigations into Democratic rival Joe Biden and his son Hunter — allegations that were at the heart of an impeachment trial that ended with Trump's acquittal by the Senate in February.

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World News

Varney: It's time for Joe Biden to face real questions

Varney: What does Biden think about trashing statues?

FOX Business’ Stuart Varney wonders what presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden thinks of tearing down statues, the defacing federal property, the Democratic National Committee attacking President Trump over his planned trip to Mount Rushmore or Seattle’s CHOP.

President Trump is set to attend a fireworks display for a Fourth of July celebration at Mount Rushmore, the iconic monument that honors George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.

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But the planned visit drew some ire from the Democratic National Committee, which tweeted that his visit is "glorifying white supremacy."

While the tweet was later taken down, FOX Business' Stuart Varney noted the Democrats' first thought was to "somehow slime the president" during his recent "My Take."

"So we've come to this: Virtually any statue from the past can be attacked, vandalized and torn down, and that includes George Washington," Varney said.

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New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow wrote in a Sunday op-ed that "Yes, even George Washington" statues must be taken down due to the ongoing debate over existing monuments.

"On the issue of American slavery, I am an absolutist: enslavers were amoral monsters," Blow wrote. "The very idea that one group of people believed that they had the right to own another human being is abhorrent and depraved. The fact that their control was enforced by violence was barbaric."

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Blow argued slaveowners "used anti-black dehumanization to justify the holding of slaves and the profiting from slave labor."

The New York Times columnist explained Washington owned more than 100 slaves and noted Washington's support of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 which allowed slave owners to capture runaways in any state and criminalized helping slaves to escape. The Thirteenth Amendment later nullified the law.

Varney worries "trashing the Founding Fathers" a slippery slope.

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"When only the far left's opinion on race, culture and history is the only opinion that's allowed, you know the country has a problem," Varney said.

While this debate is raging, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has remained somewhat silent, Varney noted.

"He told Politico that he supports a commission to decide on renaming military bases but that's about it," Varney said. "He hasn't held a press conference in months."

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Varney believes Americans aren't happy to see the country's history "canceled and spray painted."

"Don't tell me we are prepared to see a presidential candidate ignore what members of his own party are doing," Varney said.

Varney said Biden is also not weighing in on the defund the police movement and the death of a 16-year-old who was shot in Seattle's CHOP zone.

"So far, silence has been golden," Varney said. "He's gone up in the polls without saying a word. It's time he faced real questions, and then we'll all be able to make an informed decision in November."

Fox News' Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

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Economy

There's still time to reap this lucrative tax break

GOP senator proposing US vacation tax credit

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., is proposing a vacation tax credit for U.S. travel. FOX Business’ Ed Lawrence with more.

In March, when the COVID-19 pandemic hit with full force, the IRS made the decision to postpone the tax-filing deadline from April 15 to July 15, giving Americans three more months to get their returns in order. Now that the July 15 deadline is rapidly approaching, many filers are scrambling to get their taxes in order. But as you gather your documents and receipts and sit down to file your return, don't forget that you still have an opportunity to take advantage of one huge money-saving tax break: funding your 2019 IRA.

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FILERS MISSING JULY 15 DEADLINE MUST REQUEST EXTENSION, IRS SAYS

Normally, you get until the tax-filing deadline to fund an IRA for the year you're submitting taxes for. Had 2019 taxes been due on April 15, you would've had until April 15 to put money into your 2019 IRA. But because the deadline was pushed back three months, you now have until July 15 to contribute to last year's IRA, and doing so could result in a world of savings.

An easy way to save

Anyone with earned income can fund an IRA, and if you're looking to lower your tax bill in a very meaningful way, it pays to contribute to one. The annual contribution limit for 2019 IRAs is the same as this year's limit: $6,000 for workers under 50, and $7,000 for those 50 and over.

If you put money into a traditional IRA, you'll lower your tax burden immediately, but withdrawals from your retirement plan will be subject to taxes later on. If you fund a Roth IRA, you don't get an immediate tax break, but your withdrawals are yours to enjoy tax-free during your senior years.

MILLIONS OF TAXPAYERS RECEIVE IRS NOTICES WITH OLD PAYMENT DEADLINES

There are plenty of good reasons to house your retirement savings in a Roth IRA, but if you're hoping for immediate tax savings, a traditional IRA is the way to go. What sort of savings might you be looking at? Say you're under 50, and so the maximum amount you can contribute toward last year's IRA is $6,000. If you put in that full amount and you fall into the 22% tax bracket, you'll shave $1,320 off your 2019 tax bill. And that way, you get the best of both worlds — money earmarked for retirement that you can invest and grow, and immediate tax savings that will either cause you to owe the IRS less, or put a bigger refund in your pocket.

IS A ROTH IRA RIGHT FOR YOU?

Don’t wait

Thought the 2019 tax-filing deadline is still a few weeks away, don't wait until the very last minute to put money into your 2019 IRA. It may take a day or two for funds you contribute to clear your account, so be sure to get moving on that contribution sooner rather than later.

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Of course, some people are grappling with financial problems right now, and if you're one of them, you may not be in a position to max out last year's IRA. But remember, you don't have to contribute the full $6,000 or $7,000 to reap some tax savings, so if $500 is all you can swing, go for it. Every little bit you put into a traditional IRA will help you pay less tax to the IRS, all the while setting you up with some funds for the future.

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